Stories in a New Skin: Approaches to Inuit Literature Contemporary Studies on the North Book 3

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University of Manitoba Press #ad - Although eurowestern academic contexts and literary terminology are a relatively foreign presence in Inuit territory, Martin builds on the inherent adaptability and resilience of Inuit genres in order to foster greater southern awareness of a tradition whose audience has remained primarily northern. She draws attention to the interconnection between language, form and context and illustrates the capacity of Inuit writers, singers and storytellers to instruct diverse audiences in the appreciation of Inuit texts.

In an age where southern power-holders look north and see only vacant polar landscapes, isolated communities, it is important to note that the Inuit homeland encompasses extensive philosophical, and exploitable resources, political, and literary traditions. Stories in a new skin is a seminal text that explores these Arctic literary traditions and, in the process, reveals a pathway into Inuit literary criticism.

Stories in a New Skin: Approaches to Inuit Literature Contemporary Studies on the North Book 3 #ad - Author keavy martin considers writing, oral histories, and contemporary fiction, storytelling, and performance from a range of genres and historical periods – the classic stories and songs of Inuit oral traditions, life writing, poetry and film – and discusses the ways in which these texts constitute an autonomous literary tradition.

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Inuit Stories of Being and Rebirth: Gender, Shamanism, and the Third Sex Contemporary Studies on the North Book 6

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University of Manitoba Press #ad - Ujarak, iqallijuq, and Kupaaq were elders from the Inuit community on Igloolik Island in Nunavut. The three elders, among others, shared with Bernard Saladin d’Anglure the narratives which make up the heart of Inuit Stories of Being and Rebirth. Through their words, and historical sources recorded by Franz Boas and Knud Rasmussen, Saladin d’Anglure examines the Inuit notion of personhood and its relationship to cosmology and mythology.

Central to these stories are womb memories, narratives of birth and reincarnation, and the concept of the third sex—an intermediate identity between male and female. As explained through first-person accounts and traditional legends, the presence of transgender individuals informs Inuit relationships to one another and to the world at large, transcending the dualities of male and female, human and animal, myths, and folk tales, human and spirit.

Inuit Stories of Being and Rebirth: Gender, Shamanism, and the Third Sex Contemporary Studies on the North Book 6 #ad - This new english edition includes the 2006 preface by Claude Lévi-Strauss and an afterword by Bernard Saladin d’Anglure.

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Wisdom Sits in Places: Landscape and Language Among the Western Apache

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University of New Mexico Press #ad - He can turn linguistic anthropology into literary art. Nobody on earth outside of their culture has written about the Apaches as well as Basso does here. The bloomsbury Review. Coolly erudite, delightfully entertaining, free of cant and jargon, witty, and so well informed . Apache conceptions of wisdom, manners and morals, and of their own history are inextricably intertwined with place, and by allowing us to overhear his conversations with Apaches on these subjects Basso expands our awareness of what place can mean to people.

Most of us use the term sense of place often and rather carelessly when we think of nature or home or literature. Place may be the first of all concepts; it may be the oldest of all words. N. Keith basso gives us to understand something about the sacred and indivisible nature of words and place. But it is more than that.

Wisdom Sits in Places: Landscape and Language Among the Western Apache #ad - And this is a universal equation, a balance in the universe. Our senses of place, however, come not only from our individual experiences but also from our cultures. For more than thirty years, keith basso has been doing fieldwork among the Western Apache, and now he shares with us what he has learned of Apache place-names--where they come from and what they mean to Apaches.

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The Way to Rainy Mountain

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University of New Mexico Press #ad - The second is the voice of historical commentary. I was first told these stories by my father when I was a child. One should not be surprised, that it has remained vital, I suppose, and immediate, for that is the nature of story. And this is particularly true of the oral tradition, which exists in a dimension of timelessness.

They seem to proceed from a place of origin as old as the earth. The stories in the Way to Rainy Mountain are told in three voices. And the third is that of personal reminiscence, my own voice. First published in paperback by unm press in 1976, The Way to Rainy Mountain has sold over 200, 000 copies. The paperback edition of The Way to Rainy Mountain was first published twenty-five years ago.

The Way to Rainy Mountain #ad - The first voice is the voice of my father, the ancestral voice, and the voice of the Kiowa oral tradition. There is a turning and returning of myth, and memoir throughout, history, a narrative wheel that is as sacred as language itself. From the new Preface. I do not know how long they had existed before I heard them.

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When Languages Die: The Extinction of the World's Languages and the Erosion of Human Knowledge Oxford Studies in Sociolinguistics

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Oxford University Press #ad - It is commonly agreed by linguists and anthropologists that the majority of languages spoken now around the globe will likely disappear within our lifetime. It will fascinate linguists, anthropologists, and general readers. He uses fascinating anecdotes and portraits of some of these languages' last remaining speakers, in order to demonstrate that this knowledge about ourselves and the world is inherently precious and once gone, will be lost forever.

David harrison's book is the first to focus on the essential question, what is lost when a language dies? What forms of knowledge are embedded in a language's structure and vocabulary? And how harmful is it to humanity that such knowledge is lost forever?Harrison spans the globe from Siberia, to the Himalayas and elsewhere, to North America, to look at the human knowledge that is slowly being lost as the languages that express it fade from sight.

When Languages Die: The Extinction of the World's Languages and the Erosion of Human Knowledge Oxford Studies in Sociolinguistics #ad - Harrison's book is a testament not only to the pressing issue of language death, but to the remarkable span of human knowledge and ingenuity. The phenomenon known as language death has started to accelerate as the world has grown smaller. This extinction of languages, and the knowledge therein, has no parallel in human history.

This knowledge is not only our cultural heritage oral histories, poetry, stories, etc. But very useful knowledge about plants, animals, the seasons, and other aspects of the natural world--not to mention our understanding of the capacities of the human mind. K.

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Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit: What Inuit Have Always Known to Be True

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Fernwood Publishing #ad - While much research has articulated the impacts of colonization and recognized that Indigenous cultures and worldviews are central to the well-being of Indigenous peoples and communities, little work has been done to preserve Inuit culture. The book functions as a way of preserving important knowledge and tradition, contextualizing that knowledge within Canada’s colonial legacy and providing an Inuit perspective on how we relate to each other, to other living beings and the environment.

. The inuit have experienced colonization and the resulting disregard for the societal systems, beliefs and support structures foundational to Inuit culture for generations. Unfortunately, most people have a very limited understanding of Inuit culture, and often apply only a few trappings of culture — past practices, artifacts and catchwords —to projects to justify cultural relevance.

Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit: What Inuit Have Always Known to Be True #ad - Inuit qaujimajatuqangit — meaning all the extensive knowledge and experience passed from generation to generation — is a collection of contributions by well- known and respected Inuit Elders.

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WHEREAS: Poems

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Graywolf Press #ad - Today she stood sunlight on her shoulders lean and straight to share a song in Diné, her father’s language. What did i know of our language but pieces? Would I teach her to be pieces? Until a friend comforted, Don’t worry, you and your daughter will learn together. I am, i must mother, meaning i am a citizen of the oglala lakota nation—and in this dual citizenship I must work, I must listen, I must art, I must eat, “a citizen of the United States and an enrolled member of the Oglala Sioux Tribe, I must observe, ” she writes, I must friend, constantly I must live.

This strident, plaintive book introduces a major new voice in contemporary literature. Through a virtuosic array of short lyrics, resolutions, her own writing, prose poems, Layli Long Soldier has created a brilliantly innovative text to examine histories, landscapes, longer narrative sequences, and disclaimers, and her predicament inside national affiliations.

WHEREAS: Poems #ad - The astonishing, powerful debut by the winner of a 2016 whiting writers' AwardWHEREAS her birth signaled the responsibility as mother to teach what it is to be Lakota therein the question: What did I know about being Lakota? Signaled panic, blood rush my embarrassment. To sing she motions simultaneously with her hands; I watch her be in multiple musics.

From “whereas statements”whereas confronts the coercive language of the United States government in its responses, and apologies to Native American peoples and tribes, treaties, and reflects that language in its officiousness and duplicity back on its perpetrators.

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Split Tooth

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Viking #ad - She knows joy, and friendship, and parents' love. Longlisted for the 2018 scotiabank giller prizeshortlisted for the 2019 amazon first novel awardshortlisted for the 2019 kobo emerging writer prizeWinner of the 2019 Indigenous Voices Award for Published Prose in EnglishWinner of the 2018 Alcuin Society Awards for Excellence in Book Design – Prose FictionLonglisted for the 2019 Sunburst AwardFrom the internationally acclaimed Inuit throat singer who has dazzled and enthralled the world with music it had never heard before, a fierce, tender, heartbreaking story unlike anything you've ever read.

Fact can be as strange as fiction. She knows boredom, and listlessness, and bullying. She knows the tedium of the everyday world, amoral power of the ice and sky, and the raw, the seductive energy of the animal world. It can also be as dark, as violent, as rapturous. She sees the spirits that surround her, and the immense power that dwarfs all of us.

When she becomes pregnant, she must navigate all this. Veering back and forth between the grittiest features of a small arctic town, the electrifying proximity of the world of animals, Tanya Tagaq explores a world where the distinctions between good and evil, animal and human, victim and transgressor, and ravishing world of myth, real and imagined lose their meaning, but the guiding power of love remains.

Split Tooth #ad - Haunting, myth and reality, poetry and prose, exhilarating, Tagaq moves effortlessly between fiction and memoir, brooding, and tender all at once, and conjures a world and a heroine readers will never forget. She knows the ravages of alcohol, and violence at the hands of those she should be able to trust.

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Storyteller

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Penguin Books #ad - As she mixes traditional and western literary genres, nature, and identity; communicates Native American notions regarding time, power, alienation, Silko examines themes of memory, and spirituality; and explores how stories and storytelling shape people and communities. Storyteller illustrates how one can frame collective cultural identity in contemporary literary forms, as well as illuminates the importance of myth, oral tradition, and ritual in Silko's own work.

Storyteller #ad - Now back in print—a classic work of native american literature by the bestselling author of CeremonyLeslie Marmon Silko's groundbreaking book Storyteller, blends original short stories and poetry influenced by the traditional oral tales that she heard growing up on the Laguna Pueblo in New Mexico with autobiographical passages, first published in 1981, family memories, folktales, and photographs.

This edition includes a new introduction by Silko and previously unpublished photographs.

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Why Indigenous Literatures Matter Indigenous Studies

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Wilfrid Laurier University Press #ad - In considering the connections between literature and lived experience, this book contemplates four key questions at the heart of Indigenous kinship traditions: How do we learn to be human? How do we become good relatives? How do we become good ancestors? How do we learn to live together? Blending personal narrative and broader historical and cultural analysis with close readings of key creative and critical texts, Justice argues that Indigenous writers engage with these questions in part to challenge settler-colonial policies and practices that have targeted Indigenous connections to land, family, history, and self.

Written with a generalist reader firmly in mind, but addressing issues of interest to specialists in the field, this book welcomes new audiences to Indigenous literary studies while offering more seasoned readers a renewed appreciation for these transformative literary traditions. Part survey of the field of indigenous literary studies, creative, part cultural history, and part literary polemic, Why Indigenous Literatures Matter asserts the vital significance of literary expression to the political, and intellectual efforts of Indigenous peoples today.

Why Indigenous Literatures Matter Indigenous Studies #ad - This provocative volume challenges readers to critically consider and rethink their assumptions about Indigenous literature, history, and politics while never forgetting the emotional connections of our shared humanity and the power of story to effect personal and social change. More importantly, indigenous writers imaginatively engage the many ways that communities and individuals have sought to nurture these relationships and project them into the future.

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